Harder To Kill Radio 255 Learn How To Live Your Life Without Restrictions w/ The Sassy Dietitian Laura Ligos

Learn How To Live Your Life Without Restrictions w/ The Sassy Dietitian Laura Ligos – Harder To Kill Radio 255

Laura Ligos, AKA The Sassy Dietitian, loves to dissect what we see on Instagram and shed light on truths surrounding fitness and nutrition. An advocate for the nutrition profession, understanding how food fuels the body and how you can make it fun, Laura is here to debunk everything from macros and fat consumption to how to get a handle on holiday eating.

Harder To Kill Radio 255 Learn How To Live Your Life Without Restrictions w/ The Sassy Dietitian Laura Ligos

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Focus More On What Makes Your Body Feel Good

Giving yourself grace in regards to food is just as important as anything else, and it is only by becoming okay with the mess and mistakes that you can learn from them and figure out what works best for your unique body. Learn all about the dangers of pre-workout, things to pay attention too when looking at your health, and why you should focus more on what makes your body feel good than what the internet tells you should feel good.

An important voice bringing a dose of reality, Laura is helping her clients make the choices aligned for them and ultimately works to help people feel good at the end of the day. If you want to learn how to live your life without restriction while still feeling empowered enough to choose what is working for you, this is an episode you do not want to miss.

Are you ready to pick yourself up and keep going with your health goals instead of getting sucked into the spiral of negativity? Share what you loved most about Laura’s no BS attitude in the comments below.

On Today’s Episode

  • How to get over the hump and start having fun in the kitchen (12:57)
  • Understand the long term effects of overtraining and over supplementing (19:20)
  • The truth about macro’s and why you should question your macro coach (30:42)
  • Ways to use tracking as a tool in your nutrition toolbox without overdoing it (45:15)
  • The importance of planning your meals and movement throughout the holidays (55:21)

Resources Mentioned In This Show

The Sassy Dietitian Website

Follow The Sassy Dietitian on Instagram

Leave Steph a Voice Message Here

Get the Made Strong + Core 4 Book Bundle Here

Nutritional Therapy Association Website

Quotes

“Now you get to go experience the process of getting messy in the kitchen and learning new techniques with one another and actually realizing that food can be fun and enjoyable, it doesn’t have to be this chore or this negative either I’m eating healthy or I am not eating healthy foods.” (12:03)

“You have to do what works for you and look at your plate because everyone is different.” (17:25)

“If you want to live your healthiest, happiest life for the longest time possible, you don’t want to be mimicking these elite athletes.” (27:30)

“Think about yourself at 80 or 90 years old, would you still want to be tracking macros? And when I say that people laugh and I am like, ‘exactly’. This is not a long term approach, this is not something you want to be tied down to forever.” (35:51)

“I can make my own decisions when I go to these events and I can come out on the other side happy, healthy and feeling really good about myself while not affecting my health in a negative way.” (51:57)

 “You don’t always have control over the situation, you may have to go to a party where you don’t even get to bring food, but in the situations that you do, make it fun and make it food that you feel good about.” (58:34)

The Core 4 is now available! Click here to get a free gift when you purchase.

Harder to Kill Radio is sponsored by the Nutritional Therapy Association. Registration is now open for the NTA’s Nutritional Therapy Practitioner Online Program. Learn more and save your seat (and don’t forget to mention my name on your application!)

man and woman cooking in the kitchen with veggies and chopping board

You can also try out their free 7-day course, Nutritional Therapy 101 by clicking here.

Learn How To Live Your Life Without Restrictions w/ The Sassy Dietitian Laura Ligos FULL TRANSCRIPT

Steph:
This is harder to kill radio episode 255 and today we are talking with Laura Legos, this sassy dietician. We are digging into some myths and truths about fitness and nutrition. You definitely don’t want to miss this one. Let’s go. I’m Steph Gaudreau. I help women get stronger, know their worth and take up space without restrictive dieting or exercise as punishment. I’m here to share that you can approach nutrition, fitness, and mindset from a place of nourishment so you begin to trust yourself more deeply. Let’s talk about how to embrace your body and own your power. Now with over two and a half million downloads, this is harder to kill radio.

Steph:
Well, let’s go in on welcome back to harder to kill radio. Thank you so very much for hanging out with me today. Oh, this is a bit of a spicy show today. We don’t often get really spicy on the Tuesday show, but today I am welcoming my guest Laura Legos. She is known as the sassy dietician and for good reason, she has no problem. Bring in the real talk when it comes to nutrition and fitness and really talking about, we’re going to sort through some myth versus truth today with some topics having to do with, you know, how perfect do we have to have our nutrition? How hard do we really have to train? What are some of the common misconceptions and missteps that people are taking when they are starting out with food and movement and how can we find a more middle ground? How can we also enjoy the healthy things that we’re doing, the changes we’re trying to implement in our lives so we can actually live our lives?

Steph:
That’s what we’re going to be digging into today. Remember, you can send me a question that I can answer on Friday’s show. Leave me a voicemail. Go to stephgaudreau.com/message and in case you don’t know how to spell my last name, maybe you’re new here. G a U. D R. E. a. U. Yes, French Canadian. So many vowels, but we can do hard things so stephgaudreau.com/message and leave me a voicemail. I will pick the best ones and I will answer them on Fridays. Today’s podcast is sponsored by the core four embrace your body, own your power. That is my book that came out this summer. It is chock full of a four-part strategy for helping you really improve your health from the inside out. Learning how to find more sustainability, more balanced, less perfection, less shame, less guilt for not being perfect. Oh my goodness. Can just let that stuff

Steph:
go. I hope so. And if you’re looking for a plan to help you get started, you’re looking for guidance, you want some mindset shift along the way. The core four is going to bring it to you so you can go ahead and get a signed copy over@stephgaudreau.com of course and I would love to send you one and before we jump into today’s content, today’s show is brought to you by the nutritional therapy association, the NTA trains and certifies nutritional therapy practitioners like myself. I did the program in 2018 and it was one of the best things that I have ever done for myself professionally. In the realm of nutrition. The NTA emphasizes whole food properly prepared and nutrient-dense frameworks as the key to restoring balance in the body. They’ve just launched a brand new online program for NTPs where students take an in-depth look at things like function and dysfunction of body systems, food quality, health and wellness barriers, emotional wellbeing environment, the importance of sleep and movement and stress. And you know, we love all those topics here and how they affect the body. As a student, you’ll be empowered with motivational interviewing techniques, clinical and practical skills, and all the most up to date knowledge to become a highly recognized and respected nutrition and wellness professionals in your community. Registration is now open and seats are filling up quickly. You can learn more and save your seat by going to nutritional therapy.com and of course, remember to mention my name on your application. Alrighty, let’s jump into this episode 255 with Laura Legos, the sassy dietician.

Steph:
Hey there, welcome back to harder to kill radio. Thanks so much for hanging out with me today and joining me on another Tuesday expert guest interview show. Oh, today is going to be, you know, sometimes our Tuesday shows don’t get as like chili pepper hot as a Friday show where I get on the mic by myself. But I have a feeling that today we’re going to be getting into that zone because my guest today is Laura Ligos, the sassy dietician and a, we already pre talked about some of the things that we might talk about on this show and it’s going to be good. We’re going to be getting into some of the yeah, bullshit frankly that you see on social media on some of the really confusing and not full story stuff we see about nutrition and we’re just going to dive into all of that stuff today. So welcome to the show, Laura.

Laura:
Thanks for having me. Steph. I’m excited to dive into some of the BS.

Steph:
Well for anybody who hasn’t heard of you, um, I would love to have you sort of give us your background because I feel like in this show in specific, it’s important to perhaps establish your expertise. Um, and not like, not from a, I need to prove myself sort of direction, but sort of like we’re gonna set the stage, um, with why I’m coming out and talking about some of the things that I talk about on some shows. We actually go in reverse where like at the very end of the show, have the guests kind of talk about how they got into what they got into, but what brought you to the world of dietetics and, and nutrition and fitness and some of the other stuff that you do.

Laura:
Sure, So I’ve been an athlete my entire life. Um, now it’s just more recreation, but I grew up as a lacrosse player, a swimmer. Um, so I was always kind of deep into the fitness world. I honestly didn’t know what life was not being active just because that was like, I think how my parents dealt with my energy. Um, so that was something I had always been involved in. And then my mom had food allergies growing up, so it was very, um, kind of the scary world to me of not understanding why she was having reactions or why should we eat certain foods. Um, and so kind of that combination of being in sports and trying to figure out how to feel me and then also having a mom who dealt with, you know, her own struggles. I wanted to really dive in and understand it.

Laura:
So I took my first course in nutrition the second I got to college and I fell in love with it. Our teacher actually, he explained some of the metabolic pathways by literally running around the lecture hall and at one point he likes stripped his pants off, basically like showing like how fast do you use glucose and how fast you burn glycogen. And like he was going through the whole process and I was laughing. I was literally like having so much fun and I was like, okay, this, I’m in the right place. I’m with my people because we’re talking about food and we’re talking about how, you know, food works in the body to fuel the body. Um, and then it just kinda progressed from there. And I was a swimmer in college as well. And so, um, I was intrigued by the whole, how can I get a competitive advantage by fueling myself because at five, four, I’m, I’m not a very large swimmer.

Laura:
I’m, I was like one of the shorter girls on the team. And I was like, okay, how can I maybe give myself that 1% extra chance to maybe touch the wall before someone else? Um, so that’s kind of how I got into it. Um, and then what’s really frustrating about the dietetics profession is that they really promote the clinical side of nutrition, which is to me, kind of the afterthought for many clients and patients because at that point, when you’re reaching out to people for nutrition, they’ve already kind of, you know, been down this really long journey of meds and surgeries and all other procedures that have nothing to do with nutrition. So you’re doing a lot of back work. Um, and really hoping that you can help undo what has already been done. Um, and so I was in the hospital for a while working as a dietician and I knew it was not for me because I got into it because of sports and food allergies and helping people who are active and try to prevent disease.

Laura:
Um, I necessarily want to be in the aftermath of disease. While it’s super important, it just like wasn’t my jam. I was like, I’m not, this is not fulfilling to me. So I left and started my own practice to really work with people to kind of help them understand how food can one be fun and two, you know, kind of dig through all the BS that’s out there. And that’s kind of how I got my name. Like all of my friends call me sassy. They don’t call me Laura, they call me sassy. Um, because I kept just, you know, getting so passionate about all these hot topics out there and, you know, giving it to people straight, which sometimes is hard. Um, but it’s not, I’m not be doing as a jerk. I’m normally doing it out of love and tough love and, and telling people, you know, the truth.

Steph:
A couple of things you said there, you said food can be fun. And I think for a lot of people, perhaps even the listener listening to this right now, they’re like, Oh, wait a minute. Um, even if I’m not going to be dieting, and I use that in air quotes, right? Heavy air quotes. Like we’ll probably talk about this like extreme caloric restriction, uh, at some point in the show. But even if I’m not there, um, you know, if I want to be healthy, then essentially I need to live a life like a, a, a food monk, right? Where it’s like food is only functional. It’s only, it has to be really serious. Um, I can never enjoy what I’m eating. You know what? It’s only for the purpose of like [inaudible] I’m moving my health forward and while I get that, I think sometimes, right? That can be super tricky for people. Do, can you speak to that for a little bit? Like what do you mean by food can be fun?

Laura:
So, uh, that’s a good point. I feel like the way I talk about, I try to make food really positive because if you think about it, and you know, you talk about all of the body images of body positivity, food becomes the same thing. We just start talking so negatively about it that we end up building this negative relationship with food. As you said, we only see it as a means to an end of, if I’m going to eat, you know, a candy bar, it means that I’m going to be fat. If I’m going to eat a salad, it means I’m going to be thin or healthy. And that’s not really the case. Um, and so I find that people start actually enjoying their food, enjoying cooking their food, planning it, prepping it, um, or using a prep service and they actually find, you know, I have some control over the food that I get to eat.

Laura:
And it’s not this, you know, obsessive control. It’s this, I grew it from my garden or I picked it up at the grocery store or I learned how to cook it in a cooking class. And really just having fun with, you know, how many ways can I cook broccoli and actually enjoy it or, you know, how do I, you know, get my kids involved. You know, I was just talking to one of my clients and she’s struggling with her kids. So I said, why not sign up for a cooking class together? And she was like, I never thought to do that. And I was like, that would be so much fun because now you get to go experience the process of getting messy in the kitchen and learning new with one another and actually realizing that food can be fun and enjoyable. It doesn’t have to be this chore or this negative. Um, either I’m eating healthy or I’m not eating healthy foods.

Steph:
[inaudible] I was listening, um, and this is probably a couple of years ago at this point, but I was watching the Michael Pollan documentary called Cooked, have you ever seen that? Yes. Right. And where they talk about the food, um, gathering and preparation and cooking and eating used to occupy so much of our time and now. Right. And that it’s like a, it can be a complete afterthought.

Laura:
Okay. Um, what are the sense of, so stressful to people? And I get a, we live far more stressful lives.

Steph:
Yeah. I mean, how are some of the, what are some of the other ways that you, you try to help your clients, cause I know you’re pretty, um, you’re in there, you know, coaching people and working with them. Um, what are some of the other things that you think people could try? Aside from what you already mentioned, you know, maybe taking a cooking class or something like that. Like how do we just get over the hump of like, I just need to get in the kitchen and just try a little bit of, you know, a little bit of cooking? Um, what do you tend to work with, with your clients?

Laura:
Um, there’s a lot of different methods, but you know, one is just kind of forgiving yourself or giving yourself grace like you would anything else. Like when clients come into my gym and they start working out, you know, they’re the feeling of shame or um, nervousness or anxiety that comes with going to a new gym class is kind of the same as getting in the kitchen. Cause we expect it like, okay we have to be perfect like we see on Pinterest or Instagram. But you know, I try to show behind the scenes sometimes of my kitchen and people will always reach out and they’re laughing. They’re like, it’s so good to know the like not everything looks like this curated Instagram feed. And so we start kind of retraining the way that we think cooking has to look like. It doesn’t have to look like geodes kitchen.

Laura:
Like, you know, what she does is an art. It’s beautiful. But what I do and what most of my clients do, there’s going to be a mess. There’s gonna be mistakes and there’s going to be, you know, mess-ups and we can learn from them just like we would in the gym just like we would in our jobs or as parents or you know, anything else in our life. We make mistakes. Um, and so cooking classes I find are a really good way for people to get in the kitchen. There’s tons of YouTube videos out there or even starting, I’ve had a lot of clients start from like, uh, like sun basket or um, of course I’m forgetting all their names, but the like food delivery of Hello Fresh, Blue Apron, they’re the finally coming to me but starting kind of there where it’s almost like cooking with training wheels and so they’re giving you the pre, pre-prepped um, portions and then you’re just putting it together.

Laura:
Um, and that can be another sip side step of, okay, I’m going to cook, but they’re going to do it for me and then I’m just going to follow the steps so I can start feeling confident of it tells me to cook the salmon at 400 degrees for 12 minutes. I can do that because it’s very cookie cutter and I know that I’m going to get a good result. And then from there you can start experimenting on your own. And knowing that I make mistakes all the time in the kitchen, like every day. Um, but it’s because of those mistakes that I learned how to actually, you know, I know that I once made gingerbread and forgot, uh, an egg. And you know, what happened that things sunk all the way down to the bottom. And I learned, now I know I better not forget the egg and any bread product that I make.

Steph:
Absolutely. I think those are so helpful. And I love the idea of getting one of those meal services, even if it’s not longterm, because I’ve tried a couple of them before just to see what they’re like and gosh, you know, they step you through what to do. And like, it’s, it’s kind of a great intermediate between, it’s almost like hiring a trainer for a few sessions at the gym to kind of walk you through some of the basics, right? And then you get to kind of go on your own and make it yours. And once you get that confidence, I think it’s so much easier for people.

Laura:
Totally. And I think, you know, getting away from, I think what’s hard too is that I live in a world where people are very fitness-focused and so they are surrounded by people who, you know, are cooking all the time or meal planning all the time or meal prepping all the time. And so they feel this need to like, it’s like keeping up with, you know, the Joneses. It’s like, okay, I also have to do that. Well there’s, that’s why these services came to be. And so there’s no shame in using that, even if it’s like someone who, you know, you can cook, but you know that maybe January is your busy season at work. And so you know that you’re not going to get food on the table unless you have that extra layer of help. And there’s nothing wrong with that, you know, just kind of putting away some of your pride and saying, you know, this is helpful to me and to my family.

Laura:
It doesn’t matter if it’s helpful to the person next door, um, and, and being okay with it. And I think it’s a great service. And I think that there’s a lot of different services out there. I mean some, uh, services also come fully prepped and that’s something that a lot of clients that I have will use as supplements. So, you know, they’ll, they’ll plan out three or four meals for the week, but then they’ll grab, um, we have a few in our area that are just like local producers and they’ll just get a few of those ready-made meals. Um, and that they can feel good about but they don’t have to cook every single meal for. And there’s just no shame in that. And I think we have to start getting away from that as well. And recognizing, you know, you have to do what works for you and look at your own plate because everyone is different

Steph:
for sure. Yeah, it’s a, it’s like if that’s what helps, it helps to take the pressure off you then totally do it. And right now, for the last several months, actually we have been using a local service, a my friend Joanne has a service called prepared with purpose and it’s all like super delicious. And like really healthy food and it comes to the door and my husband’s now working outside the home and I’m just like, okay, I can just send you in lunch and I don’t need to worry about it cause I’m over here trying to do my own thing. So admitting that, admitting that freely myself

Laura:
and I’ve, I’ve used it to, you know, I’m someone who I love, I love to cook. It’s just like one of my passions and I love to develop recipes but I’ve used it too because there’s just some, you just have to know like when my husband’s working 16 hour days and I’m also working a 16 hour day, like some days. That’s just how we’re going to get food on the table. Absolutely.

Steph:
Okay. So I think we started with like a really kind of nice and easy topic. Not very controversial, but I feel like a lot of what you do, um, on Instagram and on your website and is really focused on, um, I won’t say calling things out, but sort of dissecting topics in nutrition, in fitness that is very nuanced. And you know, I think a lot of what we see on social media is just these little quick sound bytes and it, you know, nutrition, we know this is like not just such a cut and dry topic, but yet that the world of social media can make it seem that way. And you do such a great job with highlighting some of the nuances, teasing apart these topics, showing the many facets of nutrition and fitness and then also, yeah, I mean sort of putting, shining a light on some things that are just kinda nonsense.

Steph:
So I think maybe the first I was like, where did we start? I think recently you put up a post about not being able to diet or supplement your way out of an over-trained body. And I think that this is something that a lot of the women in my community are dealing with, particularly because they’re like, but wait, look, I’m so dedicated, I’m exercising and like I’m really pushing it to the max and I’m really trying to be dedicated. And yet things are kind of low key falling apart or truly falling apart. And they are there. But they’re like, but I’m doing the things that I’m supposed to do. So I’m wondering if we can dissect this topic a little bit. I mean, what do you mean by this? Totally. What are some of the signs that we can look at and how do we start to get the ship going back in the right direction, especially when our culture praises people for exercise, even if it’s exercise or exercise addiction?

Laura:
totally. And I see this because I feel like I’m so deep into it. Um, but a lot of people don’t see it yet. And that’s where I think that’s why I try to just shine the light on it, to just give people that idea and it’s kind of planted in their head and say, is this something that has been affecting me? And I’m not realizing it. Um, and I think as women, we are our own worst enemies. Um, we compare ourselves to others all the time. Um, and not to say that men aren’t immune from this because I do believe that there’s that as well, but I just, I work with mostly women. And so one of the biggest signs is when someone comes to me and they’re looking, they always come in looking for weight loss, but I guarantee nine out of 10 of them are, don’t actually want weight loss.

Laura:
They’re just unhappy with the way that they feel, the way that they’re performing and just their overall nutrition and health. And one of the biggest signs to me is one, they’re complaining of fatigue, but two, they’re on like 20 different supplements because they heard it on this podcast or that, I’m not saying yours, but like the, you know, X, X podcasts, why bad guys? Or they, they, you know, read it in a, on an Instagram and they’re in on all these supplements and they’re feeling like complete garbage. And so we start kind of going through what they’re eating and what they’re doing. And a lot of times the over-training is unreal. It’s like they’re working out, they’re doing CrossFit five days a week, but then they’re also running three days a week. And then they also participate in Spartans or you know, they play a sport like a recreational sport, um, where they, they’re running a marathon next month.

Laura:
And so it’s just this incredible amount of stress that they’re putting on their body. Um, and they’re trying their best to out supplement or out diet, right? By trying to use whatever, you know, cool. New superfood there is out there. And I used to prefer superfood with heavy quotations. Um, and so, you know, we, we tend to see that and they’re not achieving their goals, whether it’s body composition or, honestly for most people it’s having the energy to be able to do their job and live their life. And if they want to go out on a hike, they can go out on a hike or they want to go hang out with friends at night. They can. Um, and so, and then, the issue with this is that what happens is, is that people start in, you know, I’ll use cross as an example because that’s what I do.

Laura:
Um, I see a lot of people doing CrossFit. They’ll try to, you know, they see gains or improvements. Um, and so they think that more is better. And so we see them here for, you know, the use to just come to three classes a week and now all of a sudden they’re coming to five or six classes a week and they’re coming in extra four to do extra work or they’re running outside of class. Um, and what happens is, is that this culture is created where now everyone else thinks, Oh, so and so is improving so greatly. I also should be doing that even though I know that today’s my rest day, so-and-so is coming to the gym, so I’m also going to go to the gym. And so we start feeding off each other and it’s really this unhealthy culture of, well, she’s doing it. I need to do it.

Laura:
Um, and I can tell you that I personally can become affected by that as well. And I think because I have a very extensive athletic background, I, my body stops me before I actually normally get into that rut because I’m just like, I’m so fatigued. I can’t, I will not work out. But it’s like this pressure of, well, everyone else is working out. Shouldn’t I be working out? Um, but it’s really not the case. And women, you know, so many of my clients, I have to tell them, you know what, why don’t we just cut back a day or two of CrossFit and we go for a walk. You know, we take a lunchtime walk or we take a walk with our dogs or a significant other, you know, use that time that you would spend in the gym, beating yourself down to just go move your body. Um, instead of beating your body up because it, people don’t realize the longterm effect it has on your body, you know, short term. Sure we can go over soreness, but longterm, the hormonal effects that happen, um, you know, are not something that can be easily reversed.

Steph:
[inaudible] yeah, I mean that that pressure is certainly real. And I think that you know, it is part of our culture, but yet there is this kind of personal responsibility. I mean, I used to coach weight lifting in a CrossFit gym and I coached CrossFit like nine or 10 years ago. But what would often happen is as the coach, right? So the person’s paying to come, right? So you’re like, Ugh. I mean like they’re paying like our member, so can I, should I like really be advising them to go home or go do something different? And sometimes I would say, you know, guess what, your S your can’t snatch your snack. You’re completely, you’re just a mess, right? You’re a mess. You’re exhausted. What’s your training schedule been like lately? When’s the last time you took some days off? And if it was clear that the person was just, you know, just exhausted, I say, okay, like either does something easier, break it down to technique or whatever or go home. And oftentimes we’d send them home and they would just go to do a workout in the garage or go for a run or go to another gym. And, um, so I feel like that’s kind of due diligence. It’s like on both parties. Right?

Laura:
It’s so true. And so we struggle with that in our gym. And one of the things that we’ve done is we’ve made Thursdays an active recovery day. Um, so we almost like to encourage that, like, okay, you can come that extra day, but we’re going to be on bikes or rowers or jogging. You know, we’re not doing anything. We’re not doing heavyweights and we’re not doing high intensity. Um, but unfortunately the culture is exactly that and you know, they’re paying members. So, um, they expect the sass from me. So, you know, I, I, I ended up doing that. I’m like, you know, that you’re here and you know that I don’t support this and I’m letting you know that I’m not going to encourage this. You can stay here against my recommendation, but I don’t recommend it. Um, and then, you know, they want to, they want to know what supplements they can take to, to do better.

Laura:
And my, my philosophy is, if you’re not an elite athlete, there’s no need for pre-workout. There’s no need, you know, putting all these extra supplements in your body. Because, you know, I think what people don’t recognize is when you’re an elite athlete, you’re taking extreme measures to gain extreme results. And it’s not, it’s for the short term. And when we look at all the documentaries they’re now doing of the football athletes and how many brain injuries and longterm effects that they’re having, like in their glory, yeah, everyone wants to be them, but no one sees the behind the scenes of not just the concussions and everything that happens in something like football, but also way that they treat their body. Um, it’s, you know, someone told me to listen, I forget what the podcast is called. I haven’t listened to it yet, but I think it’s on one of the football players and it kind of goes through also, you know, how they’re fed all these supplements between on flights, between one game to the next.

Laura:
Um, and you know how my friend was telling me about it and how shocked she was by it. And I was like, well yeah, to perform at that level, the amount of extra food and supplements, you’re probably going to have to feed your body just to be able to get from one event to the other and still produce the same results. It’s extreme and it’s not long. If we’re a longterm, it’s not for If you want to live your healthiest, happiest life for the longest time possible, it’s, you don’t want to be mimicking these elite athletes.

Steph:
Yeah, yeah. I get that question about pre-workout quite a bit in my community and I’m always like, you know, considering consider the source, like are you, somebody who is at that top, you know, that top kind of layer of, of athletes, elite performers. And if not, I mean, people get really mad at me, but I’m like, look, if you are so exhausted that you need pre-workout to get through, you’re, you know, like I’m a normal person and I don’t say that in a, in a way to disparage anybody, but like you’re a normal person doing a workout and I know you care about doing well and you want to improve, but you’re not an elite athlete and you don’t have the energy to make it through the workout. There’s bigger problems that you have than pre-workouts gonna solve for you. And oftentimes, right, it’s, it’s sort of early to late afternoon pre-workout that’s completely rammed with caffeine and other stuff. And then they’re like, but I can’t sleep. So

Laura:
yeah. Yeah. And I’m with you. I am so against pre-workout. I think I wrote a post about this and everyone got mad at me and my gym, but I’m like if you’re drinking pre-workout or energy drinks, like you must have really expensive pee. And for what? Like for what reason? And just like, like, yeah, if you need pre-workout for your afternoon workout, chances are you probably should just go home and get to bed early. Take the day off, or you doing more work is what is it getting you? And I think that’s what I always bring it back to is, you know, you’re not, people ask me all the time why I don’t really compete in something like CrossFit or run marathons. And my answer is I’ve been there, I’ve lived that lifestyle of being a competitive swimmer and I don’t want to go back there because I was sleeping all weekend. I was not going out with friends. I was not enjoying that food. Food wasn’t fun at that point. You know, I wasn’t able to go enjoy my life because my goal was to, you know, get certain times in the pool. And I wouldn’t wish that on anyone who really was, you know, who for longterm, I would only wish it for those who are at elite athletes doing it for their career or their job or whatever it might be in the short term. It’s not for, it’s not for the longterm. No. Overall health. Yeah.

Steph:
So related to that, a question that comes up a lot and is macros, and I have some strong feelings and thoughts on macros and I would love to sort of break some of this stuff down because I’m sure as a dietician you see this quite a bit, right? Like we understand science, we understand what macronutrients are, like all, all of it, right? And then there’s sometimes there’s like a cautionary tale or we’re putting out there like, Hey, just, you know, X, Y, Z, like somebody else’s macros maybe aren’t, shouldn’t be yours. And is that person that is doing your macros qualified and all this stuff. So, um, but then I feel like there’s this huge group of people who get really bought, hurt about when you say like, wait a minute, pause, let’s talk about this stuff. And it’s almost like, but macros are the best thing. And like how dare you question it. And it’s great for everybody. So I’m wondering if we can sort of start to pick some of this apart because I see this a lot in, in this world too, is like people who are not elite athletes, they do care about getting stronger and better in the gym is sometimes they drift in this direction and then all hell breaks loose.

Laura:
gladly. Oh, let me get, I remember, I don’t know when macro started to ramp up. Um, but it’s in recent history and I just remember like I, someone asked me about it and I was like, what do you mean? They’re like, yeah, macros, you’re doing macros. I’m like, what? Like, what are you talking about? And this is, I was a dietician at this point, so this makes it even more ridiculous. And I’m like, what are you talking about? They’re like, you know like you count your macros. And I was like, okay. So then I went home and I looked at it, I was like, are you kidding me? I was like, this is what, so when we’re in school, um, you know, we’re learning chemistry, biochemistry, biology, etc. Etc. And then we’d go into, you know, how to assess a patient and what the recommendations are.

Laura:
And so we get these formulas, Mifflin, st yours, the one that I tend to stick to, um, but it’s an equation that we use and we were taught how to use it, right? So we’re assessing the patient and it’s just like one aspect that we’re assessing. There’s other ways to also like look at what they’re, you know, calorie and macronutrient needs are. But this is just one to one way. And we were taught to use it almost behind the scenes of, okay, you’re assessing this patient, you’re getting a food recall from them understanding, you know, what, what they generally eat in the day. And then behind the scenes, you’re figuring out about what their body needs to, you know, be optimal. And then you’re connecting the dots, right? So someone tells me what they’re eating. I know that they probably needed about 2000 calories, but they’re eating out a lot.

Laura:
They’re probably getting more like 2,500 to 3000 so now I say, okay, what changes can I make in their diet to help them improve their lifestyle? So people caught wind of this and like, great, now we can use this and we can tell people exactly what food they need to eat every single day. And I get it to a point, you know, once I figured it out I was like, Oh you mean macronutrients? Oh you mean you know, using an actual like estimation calculator to do that. And it can work for people because it’s portion control, right? It’s teaching people, okay, maybe you’re overdoing, you know what you’re eating, but now people are abusing it and it’s going the opposite way. It’s, it’s, it’s not helpful to most people because now we’re restricting people. The amount of people who have come to me on less than 1200 calorie diets from a macro coach is upsetting.

Laura:
Like, I actually get like visibly upset when a client comes to me and I know I’m not supposed to break for them, but I’m like, I am upset that someone did this to you because it sucks because now we have to do so much more work to get you back to a hormonal balance of sorts and to improve your relationship with food so you can stop tracking food, thinking of food and numbers and start thinking of it as qualitative and enjoying enjoyment, et cetera. Um, so yeah, there’s that. Um, but basically it’s just taking your fats, proteins and carbs, right? And figuring out what proportion you need. And a lot of programs I’ve seen out there, they’re cutting fat significantly. It’s, it’s honestly, it’s a disgrace. And the issues that I have with it are numerous, but I’ve seen women come to me on, you know, 30 or 40 grams of fat, which is not nearly enough to support healthy hormones.

Laura:
And, you know, Ben trying to tell someone, okay, I need you up at 60, 80, you know, depending on the person, maybe more grams of fat a day. Um, now they’re mad at me because they’re like, there’s no possible way that I could be healthy on that. So, well, not only just the restrictive method, I also think it’s a really like mind shift and normally for most people, it’s not a healthy mind shift.

Steph:
Yeah, I mean I, I think I get the sense that you are not against awareness, right? You’re not against like awareness of knowing how much you’re eating and how could portions, how, you know, how could portions be skewed in such a direction that it’s not moving you in the direction of your goals and stuff like that. But I also get the sense like you, that we have this combination of factors, right?

Steph:
Like very low. Like the caloric intake goes down, down, down, down, down, and then also the fat intake goes down, down, down, down, down. So tease this apart. I mean, I get it, but for people listening, like why, why are these days a problem longterm? Because I think what we get stuck in is this thing where people are like, well, I feel great, or Oh, I’m losing weight. And so I’m just going to keep doing this forever. And what’s the problem? And I would love for you to kind of maybe tease apart both where we’re talking about like the caloric intake. Just can we just keep decreasing it forever? Um, and then the fat intake is really low and, and this sort of like you touched on a little bit hormonal implications of that.

Laura:
Totally. So, um, first off, what just to mind is think about yourself, uh, 80 or 90 years old, would you still want to be tracking macros? And when I say that everyone laughs and I’m like, exactly, this is not a longterm approach. This is not something that you want to be tied down to forever. You’ve never seen your grandparents sit there and track their macros, right? Like they tend to just fill a plate. You know, a lot of the older generation, they actually tend to be pretty good at filling their place because they were used to a smaller plate. They were used to smaller portions. It’s just how they were brought up. But they would never sit there on my fitness pal and be like, hold on, let me make sure this is four ounces of chicken. Otherwise, I have to, you know, cut it off. Um, so that’s just something to think of when I’m talking to y’all about all this and how it’s just not a longterm approach. It’s a short term tool for many.

Laura:
Um, but you know, a lot of times what I see people doing is they end up, I call it macro going harder. And so because a certain macro range, this, you know, mystical thing that your macro coach gives you isn’t working or isn’t working fast enough, you get keep getting cut and, or you’re told, Oh, you’re not doing it hard enough or you must be cheating or you must not be eating, you know what you say that you’re eating. So now you know, you were told to be on 1500 calories and then you’re not seeing results. So your coach kind of freaks out because a lot of these macro coaches, they’re basing their next client on the complete outcome of you losing weight and changing body composition. In a boat before and after photo. And so there they’re relying on you to actually get those results as short as possible so that they can then turn it around and get someone else to do the same.

Laura:
And so they’ll cut you down and they’ll keep cutting you down. And not every program is like this, so I don’t want to generalize, but I would say there’s a lot out there of just unqualified people who are doing this. And we actually have a group of gyms in my local area doing this and it then I get, you know, the aftermath and I’ve seen people as low as 600 calories in one day. Oh yeah, it’s, it’s not. Okay. Um, and so it’s because they end up, the clients end up seeing results. But I’ve had clients who basically told me they got to the point where they no longer could do a daily activity because they didn’t have the energy required to do set activity because most people’s BMR, which is your basal metabolic rate, it’s what you just need to live to find. Like, if you were a couch potato and you did not move, that’s what’s your organs, your tissues, your eyeballs, everything needs to actually function in a day is well above 1200 calories.

Laura:
So now you’re running the risk of throwing your body into a state of stress because you’re underfeeding what it needs to just function. So then your body downregulates because it’s like, Oh crap. Like we’re not getting the nutrients we need because it kind of down-regulates and shuts down a bit. So that’s why a lot of times some people then, you know, say F this, I’m going to, you know, 1200 calories, I don’t care anymore. I’m so hungry, I’m going to go eat everything in sight. They ended up gaining weight and it’s because their body is like, Whoa, Whoa, Whoa, Whoa, Whoa. Like we just downregulated cause we thought we weren’t going to get food and now we’re getting all this food. We don’t know what to do with it. And so your body kind of has this hormonal freak out of, are we getting food or are we not?

Laura:
Um, and so a lot of times we end up having to ramp people up very slowly from that caloric deficit to get them back to just their norm, their BMR. And then we kind of taper it up from there. So no, you can not macro harder and you should not macro harder. Even if in the short term you’re seeing those wild results you see on Instagram, it’s, believes me, it’s not worth it at all. So you know, if you’re, if your macro coach is telling you that you’re not doing it good enough, chances are it’s not the right coach for you.

Steph:
Yeah. And what about the fat intake? And we miss this a little bit and with sometimes really not great results.

Laura:
Yeah. And so, you know, fat is the highest per gram is the highest calorie nutrients. So you get four calories per gram of carbs per carbs and protein. And then it’s more than double for fat. It’s nine calories per gram. So, you know, people have figured out, Oh, if I start cutting back on fat and now all of a sudden I’m, you know, probably losing weight just because it’s not as carbs at protein aren’t as nutrient-dense. Um, and so with the fat, we need fat to absorb things like vitamin D for instance, which I’m in upstate New York, which everyone is already deficient in it because we don’t see the sun year-round. Um, and so we need it just for basic functions like that. A D and K are fat-soluble vitamins and without fat, we’re unable to actually absorb digest, and digest, absorb and utilize, those vitamins.

Laura:
And to top it off, our hormones function on fat. And so, um, you know, if you actually are, if you’re not feeding your body enough fat, your hormones end up going into this, you know, out of control spiral because it’s not, they’re not getting that support. Um, so there’s a lot of other implications for doing so. But you know, I can’t, I, you should not be below 50 grams. That’s kind of my lowest I’ve ever put anyone on. Um, and when I’m saying putting someone on, it’s normally not me being like, you can only have 50 grams or less. It’s me saying, here’s how to eat in a day and in a day you should be getting these sources of fat at these meals. Um, and less than that, you know, that’s probably for a small female, you know, less than that, you’re probably not getting, you’re not going to be able to absorb all those fat-soluble vitamins, you know, from your meats, your proteins, your vegetables, et cetera.

Steph:
Yeah, thanks for breaking all that down. Um, you know, you talked very briefly and kind of touched on the relationship with food and why this can be really troublesome for a lot of people. Um, and I, you know, again, I feel like there’s sort of this, uh, there’s lots of like stigmas and assumptions and that are out there. Like, okay, if you’re a dietician, you’re always going to be pushing, you know, car-like sugar on diabetics. Like, ’cause you’re just following the the food pyramid or like, there’s all sorts of negative stuff about that. Then there’s all sorts of stuff about, um, you know, we’re, if the relationship with food, for example, we’re doing macros or whatever diet we’re on isn’t great and we’re coming off of that. Um, then let’s look at maybe where intuitive eating has to come in. And there are all sorts of stuff that people are like, Oh my God, intuitive eating is just a bunch of woo bullshit.

Steph:
And like it’s not, it’s completely ignoring any kind of nutrition science or nutrition, you know, sound nutritional principles. So I would love for you to sort of deconstructing that idea of a relationship with food and where you see people really struggling. And then what are some of the tools that you oftentimes help them use or utilize to start making their way through that? Cause it can be really, Oh, I can be really debilitating for people I think to a to-go, well yeah, cool. Like you just want me to stop using my food scale and bringing it with me to a restaurant, but I can’t do that. I’m too scared.

Laura:
Totally. And you know, that’s why I encourage a lot of people to find a coach who will listen to them and who will tailor their approach to the person. If you’re getting a cookie-cutter macro program or cookie cutter, you know, coaching guide from someone, it’s probably not gonna work out. You need to actually sit down and talk with someone and figure out, um, you know, what, what is working and what’s not working for you. And I find that I’m digging through, I call it kind of the gray area of nutrition because I’m not in the, you know, strict dieting. I don’t really promote any type of diet, um, which isn’t sexy, so it doesn’t sell, but I’m not willing to compromise. Um, and I’m not 100% intuitive eating because, or Hayes or whatever, you know, bucket. You want to put that in because I feel like there’s something in between all of that that works in 2019 because while intuitive eating, I love it.

Laura:

I think that if more people can push towards that end of the spectrum, they tend to be happier because they can live their life without restriction. But I get that we’re being inundated daily with Instagram, Pinterest, media, you know, eh, uh, our coworkers, our family members. And so things tend to get a little bit muddied because we can’t see what is right for us versus what might be right for others versus, you know, what feels good or what doesn’t feel good. And so we have to kind of muddy through that middle water of figuring out how to get from a more restrictive approach to a more intuitive approach while still maybe using some of the tactics. Um, so what I mean by that is I have a lot of clients who come to me on macros or some type of diet. And so we, I work through what works for them and, you know, suffer some people.

Laura:
It is tracking, um, I a different program I use, um, it’s called practice better. It’s what I use for my clients and it’s, uh, a journal that has a little bit more intuitive side to it. So, people, my clients get to tell me how they feel before and after they eat. They tell me what situation they’re eating. And is it a stressful environment? Is it not? Um, we don’t necessarily track calories if it’s something that’s triggering to them. But you know, if they came to me then said tracking worked, but I’m not sure how to get off of tracking. We kind of make it a little bit more enjoyable and then we, we transfer them away from it and we teach them. We, that’s just me. I don’t know why it’s the same way, but I teach them that, you know, tracking is a tool and your nutrition toolbox, it’s something that you can use when you need it, but you should not only use it, right, you wouldn’t use a screwdriver to hammer and a nail.

Laura:
Sure you could, but it wouldn’t be as effective and it probably wouldn’t do a good job. So it’s just for, you know, maybe a few times in your life when you’re just trying to figure out portion control and then you can move on from it. And so that’s something that we’ll kind of use as a transition. A lot of times they use meal planning as a transition. And I don’t mean just the cookie-cutter meal plan. I mean, you know, teaching a person to actually look at what they have at home, create a list of recipes that they like to use and figure out how to actually say, how many meals do I actually need in a week to feed myself or feed my family? And we’d go through that whole process. So now they can start thinking of food as opposed to food as numbers and start transitioning away from that. But also encouraging the portion control. And you can do that through creating, using recipes. Cause a lot of times recipes will portion out things for you. You can use it by planning ahead so you don’t get stuck in a hanger state of I’m going to eat anything that’s not tied down. Um, and that can really help transition people as well away from the restriction. And back to the intuitive side. Um, I’m not sure if that kind of answered it or,

Steph:
yeah. Yeah. No, I think that that’s really helpful because, um, being a nutritional therapist myself and being certified to teach and kind of coach, um, intuitive eating, I do see people get very stuck in one or the other or they’re like, I’m so tied to the numbers in the quantification and, uh, I’m afraid of what would happen if I let it go. Um, and honestly, the biggest fear that people have is I’m going to gain weight. And I know that you talk a lot about the fact that, you know, we need to also look at other things that have to do with health, not just wait. So I’m wondering if you can sort of take us down some of that, uh, some of that road. Like, you know, when somebody comes to you with that, that concern, they’re lik, okay, I’ve just been tracking and I’ve been diligent, but it’s also freaking me out.

Steph:
Cause when I don’t have that ability or like, um, I don’t have my scale or like, what do I do? Um, but I, you know, from the perspective of like how else can I look at me, and I think we’ve sort of talked about it tangentially in this show, but what are some of the other things that you have your clients pay attention to? You mentioned in there in the program that you use, like just keeping track of how they feel, how their body feels when they eat and so on and so forth. Like how do you help to guide your clients to a discussion where we’re also looking at, um, health as including more factors than just weight.

Laura:
So for most of my clients, they, we actually don’t check in with weight weekly. Um, so when my clients check in weekly, for most of them, that’s not the priority. And I have found, you know, I’ve been doing this for years and I’ve made mistakes and I’ve found that by doing that, by having weight first, it’s like that was their, what they hung their hat on. Even if it was, everything else went really well, all the and their weight stayed the same or gained, that’s all they could focus on. So we really put that on the back burner. Um, and I always ask my clients every time we check-in for three wins of the week and the wins can be anything. It can be, did you get promoted at work? Did you go for a walk with your husband? Did you, you know, cook a new meal this week?

Laura:
Like what are the winds of your life that are healthy and that you’re really, you know, that you’re really proud of. Um, and they don’t have to be big. They can be really little, you know, of, I, I watched a TV show that I never make time for it cause I’m so busy focusing on social media or whatever it is. Um, and we really focus on that first. And so a lot of people call those like non-scale victories or non-scale wins. Um, but that’s really what I focus on is, okay, let’s look at the whole picture. What is going right and from what’s going right, and maybe writes the wrong word, but, the things that are making you feel good and are propelling your life for the week? Like, what, how can we use those to now then help the struggles which come next.

Laura:
So the next part we talk about as the struggles of what were your struggles, what did you struggle with this week? You know, was it, was it the scale? And sometimes we have to have conversations of, you know, did you get on the scale this week? And if you did, how did it make you feel? And if it made you feel like you are not worthy or that you were this, that, or the other thing, we take it away. It’s almost like a privilege. Like you don’t get the scale if all you can see as your value tied to it. Because at the end of the day you’re not, your weight is just your relationship to gravity and it’s not the whole picture. It’s a part of the picture. You know, if you think of your health as a puzzle, it’s one piece of the puzzle. And you know, you can look at someone and say, Oh, I can tell if they’re healthy or not based on their weight, but you would be completely wrong.

Laura:
And so we have to look at, we, you know, I look at blood work from clients, I look at how’s the, how are they sleeping? Um, we ranked stress every week on a scale of one to 10. Um, and we talked through that and you know, we look at a lot of other pieces of the puzzle. Um, you know, how do you feel in the afternoon? Are you having a 2:00 PM crash? If you’re having that, we probably need to fix some things in our diet. Um, are you having fear meal times, you know, how do you feel after a meal? Do you feel guilty? Why do you feel guilty? So we worked through so many different aspects that even the clients don’t realize until normally, like the two or three months mark, they’re like, Oh my God. Like, I can’t believe that I don’t think of this anymore, or I or, or I don’t, you know, wake up and think I’m just a number on a scale anymore.

Laura:
I wake up and I feel good about myself and you know, we’ll have them weigh in at the two or three months Mark. And they’ve either stayed the same with more freedom or even maybe they’ve lost a pound or two. You know, I’m not focused on really big weight loss in my, in my practice, but that if we start focusing on the wins and we take the weight out and then we bring it back in once they’ve kind of had this positive relationship with their body and with food and they see that the scale didn’t move or in a negative way, like most of them are mind blown. They’re like, Holy cow. Like I went to two weddings this month and I went out to dinner with friends and I had a work lunch and this wasn’t like, Oh a free for all I, you know, it wasn’t like I was like, Hey, go to the wedding and do whatever you want. It was let’s work through these weddings. And then we worked through them and we got, you know, kind of a summary after them of like, what, what did you feel good about? What made you not feel good after this wedding? And then we walked through that. So then they can start living these life scenarios and recognize I can make my own decisions when I go to these events and I can come out on the other side happy, healthy, and you know, feeling really good about myself and not affecting my health and negative man.

Steph:
Hmm. I think that’s going to be really helpful for people to hear. I’m on that train of thought. You mentioned weddings and I was sort of thinking this, this episode is going to be out just a little bit before Thanksgiving and uh, you know, here in the, in the States at least, it’s sort of like, all right, uh, October 31st rolls around and then it’s a downward slide into January. And then we’re going to like buckle down again and just go on another diet. Um, and there’s this kind of interesting phenomenon, right, where we have these seasonal kinds of, um, maybe family [inaudible] cooking dishes that only happen once a year or so. There’s this like novelty and we can’t get habituated to the food. And so it’s like, let’s enjoy ourselves. Um, and then a lot of people end up kind of with that binge or loss of control eating.

Steph:
And then on the other hand, we have people who are just like walking on eggshells, right. Trying to restrict everything in sight because um, they’re just so afraid to let themselves enjoy any food in the holiday period. And so I’m wondering, or that we see them beams like, okay, uh, you know, eye candy cane is worth this many burpees and shit like that. So. Well how do we, how do you, I like, how are we going to help people get through this holiday season with maintaining some sanity also perhaps? Yeah, enjoying food a little bit, but I’m also feeling good at the end of the day cause nobody likes to feel like rubbish. Uh, at, at the end of the day or after a holiday party.

Laura:
Totally. And we were talking about this before we have, and you don’t have to earn your food. Like you being alive, you’ve already earned the right to eat. Like you being alive means that you need to eat. So just when you see those memes, unfollow that person or get rid of them. Um, but one analogy that I always like to use, and if you’ve heard me speak before you’ve probably heard it, think about, you know, climbing a set of stairs. If you were to trip, falling up the stairs or a trip falling down the stairs, either one, would you pick yourself up and keep going? Or would you continue to throw yourself down the stairs? You would pick yourself up and keep going. So we talk about this a lot. You know, it’s in my practice of, okay, so you had, you know, uh, you ate an entire pint of ice cream.

Laura:
So what that doesn’t, that doesn’t make you a bad person. You did it, you enjoyed it. And we’re moving on. Now we can, we’ve had this scenario, we’re gonna pick ourselves up and learn from it. How did we feel after? Did we feel like crap after? Okay. We don’t want that to happen again. It’s not that we don’t want you to eat the ice cream. We don’t want you feeling sick anymore. We don’t want you feeling guilty anymore. So how can we improve that by picking ourselves up and just keep going? And I think the holidays, that’s something really helpful for a lot of people to focus on is, okay, I went to the holiday party, I had one too many drinks, which led to late-night pizza. It happens. I don’t then have to wake up the next morning and say, you know, fuck it, it doesn’t matter.

Laura:
I’m just going to go down this rabbit hole of the holidays are over instead. Why not wake up and go back to your normal breakfast and you know, continue as is. And I think once people start recognizing that that’s an option that’s available to them to just, you know, pick themselves up and keep going, they’re like, Oh my God, I had never thought of it like that. Like I thought that it was just all over and it’s not, and you know, if you’re, if you’re someone who struggles with that of really nice, you know, way to kind of help you through it is planning. And so when we talk meal planning or planning ahead with, you know, meals and what we’re eating, I have my clients plan out there, you know, their indulgences, their parties, their events so that they can just see what’s coming at them.

Laura:
And I think just knowing what’s coming at them gives them the freedom to say, okay, cool. Like I know that I have three-holiday parties this week. What are the meals outside of that? You know, I can still make myself breakfast, lunch, and dinners in between that are gonna feel really good and fuel my day. Um, and then that’ll lead me into the party feeling good. And a lot of times that’s enough for people to go in and say, OK, I’m, you know, not an unsupervised kid at, uh, you know, at a birthday party. Right. I am an adult. I’m who I am. I get to choose what I want and they normally choose a little bit better cause they just had a plan going into it. Um, and then, uh, I’m trying to think what else we owe movement. That was the next thing I wanted to talk about.

Laura:
So you shouldn’t be punishing yourself for anything that you eat. Like you don’t have to earn it. You don’t have to go work out the next morning because you ate too much the night before. But also planning your movement through the holidays. Cause I find what happens is it’s all or nothing with people. It’s either let me do the hardest CrossFit workout ever one day and not move the rest of the week or you know, it’s, it’s just absolutely nothing. And so instead find ways to move that have nothing to do with, you know, beating your body up or not earning it. Like one of my family traditions is after Thanksgiving dinner where you just go, we’d go out for a walk. Um, I know a lot of people play football, you know, they just, they move their body more intuitively, um, during the holidays and those people tend to come out better too cause they just feel better.

Laura:
Um, and it’s because they didn’t sit on the couch for 24 hours. They ended up just getting up, going for a walk or you know, hitting a hiking trail, going snowshoeing, snowboarding, whatever it is, um, use this time because you may not be able to get to the gym normally, you know, use it just to move your body. And it’s okay that you’re not hitting it hard every day. But I think that movement ends up getting people feeling better and they ended up not tripping down the stairs multiple times because they’re able to think clearly because they’re moving their body.

Steph:
That’s so great. I think that’s really going to be helpful for people to kind of reframe, um, what can be coming up because I know it can be so anxiety-inducing for different reasons, right? Like, okay, I did eat too much. I do feel kind of gross. Um, but I need to sort of like completely pendulum swinging and course correct and like start the diet the next day and like you said, beat myself up with exercise to try to make up for what I ate or the reverse, which is sort of like, well, I already started with one day, so I might as well just keep the street going, you know, like what’s the point in getting back to breakfast the next day as normal and stuff like that. So I think that’s going to be really helpful as people move toward a Thanksgiving and Christmas and beyond, um, with just being out there and enjoying life as well. Um, and not trying to feel like you have to hideaway

Laura:
totally and make, try to make the holidays fun. You know you don’t always have control over the situation. Like you may have to go to a party where you don’t even get to bring food, but in the situations that you do make it fun and make it food that you feel good about. And it doesn’t have to be the food that the internet says you have to feel good about the food that you know is gonna make you feel good after you eat it and not make you have, you know, guilt or shame or bloating or any digestive distress. Um, and you know, that can be done by offering to bring a side dish to a party or offering to host a party or you know, for Thanksgiving you picking the dishes. It doesn’t have to be the traditional Thanksgiving or Christmas dishes. It can be whatever you want.

Laura:
Uh, you know, as long as everyone generally is happy with what you pick. I used to eat ravioli for Thanksgiving cause I’m very Italian and my mom would make it for me. And then she realized that I actually like Turkey and stuffing, I just preferred ravioli. She stopped making it cause she’s like, yeah, no I’m not making you another meal. It was ridiculous. But, but just like, you know, reframing it. Like it doesn’t have to be Christmas, a cookie exchange. Right. It could be an ornament exchange. Like, just start rethinking the way that you think of these holiday parties and how can you make them so that they’re more inclusive and they make you feel good at the end.

Steph:
I love that. Well, we have so much that we did not get to. I feel like we’re going to have to come have you come back for part two. Cause there’s lots of stuff that I had on my list. I already wrote a list of topics down and we did not even scratch the surface. I feel like. Um, so if you’d like to come back at some point, I would love to, uh, do a part two or continuation and, and continue on. Cause there’s, there’s so many things you can talk about. I love this world and I, I’m yet to shut up about it. So that’s why I get my name. I love it. Um, let everybody know where they can find you on social. What’s your website and how can they learn more about working with you?

Laura:
You can find me at the sassy dietitian, um, or the sassy dietician.com. I’m mostly on Instagram. I haven’t really figured out the other social media channels, but feel free to DM me or message me on either of those and I can give you more information about my services or what I have to offer.

Steph:
Wonderful. And we’ll link all of that in the show notes. Laura, thank you so much for coming on the show. Sharing your point of view and expertise with us. You are so grounded and I just feel like such an important voice that’s out there in these communities. Fitness and nutrition, who’s bringing a dose of reality and really helping to empower people to make the choices that are really aligned for them. So we didn’t, can we clone you?

Laura:
I’m trying. You know, I feel like one of my goals is just an advocate for the nutrition profession, um, and really empower people who do have the education experience to speak up. Because I think the problem and the culture are that those of us who don’t want to do harm, because we know how much we don’t know, we don’t speak up, but we should speak up because we need to. We need to crowd out all the other, you know, BS that’s out there. And I think that the more I can help empower people to do that, the better.

Steph:

Amen. All right, Laura Legos. Thanks for being on Harder To Kill Radio.
I told you, I told you Laura does not mince words, but she comes from a place of love and care and compassion and that is why I brought her on the podcast. I really love the things that she’s talking about. She tries to make her community think and really come from a place of finding more care and nourishment for ourselves while also yes, sometimes improving our health or making our fitness goals or whatever that might be. Uh, she’s not saying that we can’t have those things, but how we go about it, let’s find a way that includes more ease and enjoyment. I mean, that’s what life is all about. To get the show notes for this episode, to learn how to connect with Laura and to get the full transcript, you’re going to want to go over to my website. Yes, Steph gaudreau.com there. You can dig into all of that amazing goodness and of course if you have a question that came to mind, something related to fitness or nutrition or mindset that you would love for me to answer on the Friday episode of this show, please leave me a message@stephgaudreau.com slash message you can just leave me a voicemail.

It’s like you’re talking to me and then I’ll play that on the show and I won’t answer your question. It’s so very cool and I can’t wait to hear what you have to ask. One final request and that is to hit the subscribe button on your podcast app. It helps the show to rise up the rankings and become more visible to new people, much like yourself who are very interested in these topics and want to learn more. It’s so simple. You just hit that subscribe button and it’s easy. It’s done. That’s all I have for you today. I will be back on Friday for an episode of fierce love Friday. Of course, we’re going to be rounding out 2019 pretty soon. We only have a few episodes in the year left. I’m so excited. I can’t wait for 2020 I don’t know why I’m so pumped for it, but we’re not done yet. So I will be back on Friday for Fierce Love Friday. I cannot wait to talk to you then. And until then, you know what I’m going to say Be Well!

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2 Responses

  1. I love the comments on the macro trend! As and RD myself, I was approached by family about what I thought about macros, and I had the same response – we eat them on a daily basis…protein, carbs, and fat. I didn’t know what they were talking about in relation to “macro diet.” I really appreciate your view on these things and others! I would love to hear what you think about how to work with people in a cardiac rehab setting who are less interested in health/nutrition. I work in a clinical setting which some is after a heart attack or had a minor heart procedure and looking at secondary prevention. I hear your advice pertaining to people who are super motivated to for a healthy lifestyle, but I work with some people who don’t really want to pay attention to how they feel and just want to eat meat/potatoes and roll their eyes at healthy eating changes. Any thoughts?

    1. Thanks for sharing your thoughts Melinda. I can’t speak for Laura (if that’s who you’re directing your question to…I’m not sure if she’ll see this) but from my perspective as an NTP, a couple things: meeting people where they’re at via small changes, exploring the possibility of adding things to their nutrition plan before taking things away (crowding out), and having compassion are all things that are super important when I work with people on nutrition. Lots of people who aren’t well or feeling good in their bodies, especially if it’s chronic, have been shamed by healthcare professionals or treated with less than kindness along the way, and that can lead to lots of fear and walls going up. Many of them are well aware that they’ve not been caring for themselves or doing what’s necessary. They need an ally, not a disciplinarian.

      Also, making sure people have access to info about how to cook can be helpful. Nothing wrong with meat and potatoes but helping people learn to prepare them at home more healthfully and then helping them incorporate more veggies, helping them learning preparation methods that are delicious, promoting exploration/curiosity/fun with new foods…all help clients I’ve worked with stick with changes longer term.

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Hi, I'm Steph!

Lord of the Rings nerd, cold brew drinker, and depending on who you ask, crazy cat lady. My mission is to help you fuel for more, not less: bigger muscles, strength, energy, and possibilities. We’ll do it with my signature blend of science, strategy…and a little bit of sass.

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