Self Worth vs Body Size w/ Maida Ference

Often we are so disconnected from our bodies that we wait for someone else to tell us what we should be doing rather than discerning what is right for us on our own. Maida Ference has her own unique relationship with food, body image and nutrition and is here today to address the cause and effect of what you are eating and how it impacts how you show up in the world.

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Dismiss Expectations & Highlight The Importance Of Forgiveness

The owner of Nuanced Nutrition and fellow nutritional therapy practitioner, Maida has experienced the implications of being in a larger size body and a straighter size body and is here today to share her experience with you. Over the course of the last seven years, Maida has been able to figure out the right way to eat for her body and is passionate about creating a space where people are able to share openly and vulnerably.

Whether you are in a larger body or a smaller body, Maida is here to dismiss expectations and highlight the importance of forgiveness in the relationship between you and your body. Our mindset, history and life experiences all impact our food consumption, and it is only by accepting that you can do anything you want in the body that you have right now that you can start to believe all that you are capable of.

Have you subconsciously linked your self-worth or ability to connect with the size of your body? Share what you relate to most about Maida’s journey of self-discovery and body acceptance with us in the comments below.

On Today’s Episode

  • How to get into your body and discern what is truly the right fit for you (8:35)
  • Addressing the implications of being in a larger size or straighter size body (12:10)
  • Tips for finding connection and joy within your body at any size or state (18:40)
  • What it is like to undergo surgery that alters your outward bodily appearance (21:42)
  • How to navigate a changing body without it becoming a ‘before and after’ (24:30)
  • The role of sobriety and embracing a 12 step program in your food journey (29:20)

Resources Mentioned In This Show

Nuanced Nutrition Website

Follow Nuanced Nutrition on Facebook | Instagram

LTYB 272: Introducing The Listen To Your Body Podcast

HTK 188: What is Nutritional Therapy?

Nutritional Therapy Association Website

Join the Core 4 Facebook Club

Quotes

“We can sit there and argue all day long about the right way to do something, but if we are not asking each other ‘why do you believe that?’ or ‘what is your experience of that?’ then we are missing out.” (10:18)

“I started to recognize the cause and effect of what I was eating and how it impacted how I walked through the world, how I was able to show up.” (17:05)

“You can do anything in the body you have right now, you don’t have to fit into someone else’s framework of what that is supposed to look like.” (19:16)

“You can experience the freedom and the joy and the connection that I have experienced in the past 7 years, without your body changing on the outside.” (27:16)

“I didn’t realize how much I lied to myself and how that impacted and how much it was driven by fear, and doing that work allows me to be completely rigorously humbly honest and to know that there is a reason.” (33:18)

The Core 4 is now available! Click here to get a free gift when you purchase.

Listen To Your Body Podcast is sponsored by the Nutritional Therapy Association. Registration is now open for the NTA’s Nutritional Therapy Practitioner Online Program. Learn more and save your seat (and don’t forget to mention my name on your application!)

man and woman cooking in the kitchen with veggies and chopping board

Self Worth vs Body Size w/ Maida Ference FULL TRANSCRIPT

Steph:
This is episode 274 of the listen to your body podcast. On today’s show, I’m welcoming a special guest, my difference and we are digging into some nuanced nutrition. The next evolution of harder to kill radio is here. Welcome to listen to your body podcast. On this show, we’ll explore the intersection of body, mind and soul health and help you reclaim your abilities to eat and move more intuitively. Hear your body’s signals and trust yourself more deeply. I’m Steph Gaudreau, a certified intuitive eating counselor, nutritional therapy practitioner, and strength coach. On this podcast, you can expect to hear expert guest interviews and solo chats that will help you deepen your trust with the food movement and your body. Remember to hit the subscribe button and share this podcast with your friends and loved ones now onto the show.

Steph:
Hello, welcome back to the show. Thanks so much for joining me today. If you haven’t heard yet, harder to kill radio is now the listen to your body podcast. Just in case you were a little bit surprised. If you’ve been behind on episodes, you can go back and listen to episode two 72 and I detail all of that there for you, but thanks so much for returning and continuing this journey with me and all of my guests. Today’s show is with Maida Ferenc. She is a nutritional therapy practitioner, much like myself and she is the owner of nuanced nutrition and of course no surprise. We talked a lot about the nuances of nutrition but I also really appreciate my Dez openness and her candor about her own journey through different body changes and sizes and what that’s been like for her, things that she experienced that she never expected throughout her own personal life and why she is doing the work that she’s doing today.

Steph:
She really did open up her heart and I just have so much love for this conversation and these points of view that she shared. It really is I think through the richness of sharing as many voices, as many conversations in this space as possible that we continue to challenge diet culture. We continue to challenge old beliefs, old ways of doing things and really look at how are we helping people tune in yes to their bodies, but to live in a space that is free from the damages and all of the things that diet culture is taking away from us and Maida so wonderfully is a part of this with us here on this show and I’m very, very grateful for that. Before we dip into today’s episode, a couple of messages, announcements, things to say. The first is if you’d like to get on my listen to your body specific newsletter, it’s not just for the podcast, but it’s really going to be the place where I’m sharing teaching, coaching and extended thoughts on the different topics that we bring to the show and about intuitive eating and so much more than you can go to Steph gaudreau.com/l T Y B or listen to your body and get on the newsletter.

Steph:
Look, I don’t have anything like fancy and free to give ya to entice you to get over there just to say that I am committed to continuing to help you with this and showing up to teach and coach and be in that space. So if you’re down with it, you want to know more, you want to get in on those newsletters than just head over to again, Steph gaudreau.com/l T Y B and you know, one of the best things I ever did for myself professionally was to put myself through the nutritional therapy associations MTP program. I did that in 2018 and I really looking back can see how incredibly important it was in my ability to be able to approach and address people’s nutrition from a really bio-individual approach, from a range of nutritional strategies, everything from how to properly prepare foods, how to restore balance in the body, how to include things like emotional wellbeing, the role of the environment, sleep, movement, stress.

Steph:
All of that was so incredibly powerful, so important in my ability to listen to my body, to my ability to coach people through what that’s like. The NTA is the sponsor of today’s show and I want to encourage you, if you’ve been wondering what their programs are like, what you learn in terms of motivational interviewing, your clinical and practical skills, everything that you need to know to be able to work with people from a bio-individual approach to nutrition, head over to their website, nutritional therapy.com there’s a link also in my show notes that you can check it out and if you want to hear my episode that I did on nutritional therapy, then go ahead and tune in to episode one 88 their registration is now open and seats are going to fill up pretty quickly. So go over to nutritional therapy.com learn more and of course, if you join, don’t forget to mention my name on your application. Oh my goodness, Maida. Welcome to the show.

Maida:
Thank you, Steph.

Steph:
I am so excited to have you here. Not only because, okay. So if people haven’t listened to the show in the last couple of weeks, like you’re probably going to notice that we have a different name. The podcast has been renamed and I had so many people that I really wanted to have on the show post rebrand and you are one of them. Um, just because of alignment, because of the kind of conversation I wanted to have with you and the things that you really are doing the most beautiful job talking about in the world with regard to your experiences. And so I’m excited that it’s finally here. Thank you. Um, and we’re gonna sit down and have this chat and I’m, and I love, first of all, I think there could be no more perfect, uh, name your name and on Instagram and the name of your business is nuanced nutrition. I mean, hello. It’s perfect.

Steph:
It’s a complex subject.

Steph:
It is a complex subject and yet in this world that we are in, everybody wants to boil it down into their own. Like, you know, draw the line in the sand. Like I am in this box. This is what I do. Why, why have you decided to go your own way with that?

Steph:
I just have seen that inexperienced, that all or nothing mindset for so long. And I realized that I was, there was so much noise out there coming from outside of me and I was trying to discern where I fit in all of the noise, like what my niche was like, where, how I was supposed to nourish or what my body was supposed to look like. And I never paid attention to how I felt or how things tasted or how they worked in my body. And so that’s why it’s so important to me because there’s a lot more to it. Even just beside the physical and, um, recognizing how our mindset, our histories, our experiences and um, and then our experience of food and movement and all of those things in our body. And we’re so disconnected because we have all this noise around us. So I aim to like help people get into their bodies so they can just more easily discern, um, what’s right for them and not have to count on someone else to tell them.

Steph:
[inaudible] do you think social media is, I would love people to weigh in on this. Do you feel social media making the kind of nuanced discussions that you would love to have or the nuance that you see as being really integral to like holistic, whole-person health? Do you think his social media is making that stuff easier or harder?

Maida:
No, I, I kind of live in a bubble, you know, because I surround myself with either people who have similar mindsets I do or from whom I feel like I can grow. And, um, and that is something that I challenge other people to recognize is how is who you’re following? What are they, how do they make you feel? What do they make you think? Do they make you feel like you know less, um, or that you have space to grow? And I think that it’s just, it varies and we can, um, so I’ve, I’ve created kind of a bubble for myself that doesn’t, it doesn’t keep me from learning and growing, but it just keeps out the noise. And so, um, I think it can go either way because we can sit there and argue all day long, um, about the right way to do something. But if we’re not asking each other, why do you believe that or what is your experience of that, then we’re missing out.

Maida:
It just becomes ego and, um, I know more than you are, you know, I know something that you don’t know or it just, and so, um, I think it’s kind of up to us to recognize person by person, um, conversation by conversation, what we’re missing and look for those, um, look for where we’re closing each other off and just spouting and not actually having a conversation and rather just, um, kind of preaching, you know? So I think, I think it goes either way. I feel like in my experience, I’ve been able to find that, that nuance.

Steph:
Yeah, you did such a wonderful job of that and pretty recently you posted something on Instagram that really, um, gosh, I was so, it was just so, I was so appreciative of you being real and sharing what you’ve been through and the courage and vulnerability that it took to probably post that. Um, so, you know, you have a really interesting story. I feel like a lot of people in this space doing the things that we’re doing. You’re a functional nutritional therapy practitioner. I’m a nutritional therapy practitioner. Like we’re all working in this realm of nourishment and the whole person and things like that. But I feel like a lot of us, and I would say speak for myself here who come to this, you know, we’ve always been in a straight size body, but body image has been a struggle. Um, maybe there’s some disordered eating thrown into the mix there too.

Steph:
But you know, I was thinking recently how a lot of people, um, in our space haven’t necessarily been in a larger body or spent time in a larger body. And, you know, we’re, we don’t necessarily know firsthand what that’s like, what it’s like, you know, how you experienced the world if you are in a larger body and you have had that experience. And I would love for you to kind of walk us through your story cause your conclusion to this post was, um, I, I guess some people might find it surprising in, um, you know, what you were talking about in terms of health and the size of your body and all the things that went into that. So you kind of take us through that part of your, your own health journey. Um, and what that was like for you.

Maida:
Certainly. Well, um, you know, I always was a chubby kid. I mean that was, I felt like that was an in my culture, you know, that’s, it’s, it’s cute, you know, you’re good feet done. But, um, when I, I remember we started as a family, you know, dieting when I was about 14. And I also recognize that there were, um, there were things that I missed out on because I didn’t, um, fit into the height, weight chart. So while I was, um, had danced for over a decade, you know, I missed out on being on the drill team because I didn’t weigh 140 pounds, you know, like those sorts of things, which I’m glad to see are changing. But, um, those sorts of things. We started dieting when I was 14, and, um, it’s that continued for about 30 years. And, um, I was in a much larger body and, you know, they have these categories that they fit us into.

Maida:
And for me, that category was super morbidly obese and I was there for about a decade. And now I look back and I’m like, what does that even mean? Like, what is, what are the implications of that and how does that impact the way I was able to get care or, um, have the details of my health even recognized because of all they just saw with this, this label and this body. And, um, but in 2007, I, after many years of, um, not being willing to have gastric bypass surgery, cause you know, I saw that episode of Oprah where all of the, um, guests talked about the reasons they regretted having weight loss surgery. And, um, but I went to this church retreat and after the retreat, I felt like I deserve to ask for help. And, um, after a lot of research I chose to have bariatric surgery.

Maida:
And, um, over the course of time I lost about half of my weight and I kept it off for, you know, five years at the time that I came to a whole food eating. And, um, and I just felt smaller. I didn’t, you know, the costume part, angels didn’t sing. I wasn’t immediately like full of energy, you know, I didn’t have a better job. I didn’t have, you know, like I, it just was, it wasn’t the magical thing that I thought being in a smaller body would be. And, um, and I didn’t feel healthier even. And someone posted on Facebook that his wife’s vision had improved and she was over 50. And he attributed it to his, um, his lifestyle. And I asked him if he would join me for coffee and tell me about that. And I was just so intrigued and he told me about paleo lifestyle and it was just also very big, you know, Amber glasses at night and grounding and, and um, you know, having the sun on his chest and not eating dairy and all these things and it just felt very, very big.

Maida:
But he was kind enough to take it down to baby steps and recommend a book. And um, I just started experimenting. And um, really that first when I first, um, eliminated gluten and I decided to do it as an experiment, it wasn’t like, I need to do this and it’s going to get me there. It was the first time I did something and was like, Hmm, I wonder what this is going to be like. And my digestion completely changed and I haven’t had a migraine headache in seven years. And I started to recognize the cause and effect of what I was eating and how it impacted how I walked through the world. Just how I was able to show up. And, um, so over the course of seven years, um, I’ve been able to discern more and more, um, what the right way for me to eat is.

Maida:
And that changes on a daily basis. Um, it changes with, you know, how I move, how I sleep, um, if my, if I’m feeling depleted, whatever it is. But I’m so grateful to have this connection to my body. But the interesting thing is, is that all of this change happened in this now seven-year period of time. And the size of my body, like what people see from the outside, it’s like they equate it to weight loss, but my body has changed very little from an appearance standpoint and, um, but my health and my energy and my joy and, um, that has, um, improved significantly. And I think that, um, my experience is that as I’m walking through the world, people will equate that with weight loss and say, Oh, you keep losing weight. And I’m like, no. And, and it’s, um, but it’s an, it’s a very, very strange thing to be in a place where you like had this experience of um, expecting being in a smaller body to feel or certain way or to be, um, and, and it not, and then having the joy of this discovery and my body didn’t have to change, define that joy and it’s just, I just want to give a little taste to everyone to know what that connection feels like and to, and to know that, that your health can change your, your ability, um, you can do anything in the body that you have right now.

Maida:
You don’t have to fit into someone else’s, um, a framework of what that’s supposed to look like.

Steph:
Definitely. Um, you know, I know one of the things that comes up for folks when they do experience a big change in body size decrease is oftentimes very, you know, there’s implications, perhaps physical implications. Like there’s loose skin or their experience in the world becomes different and perhaps some, they needed an expert. And before we were talking off-air, before we started recording, you were talking about things like, you know, having to deal with the like, do I even want to be seen by people or am I getting attention that I didn’t expect I would be getting, like, will you talk, tell us what that was like or what that has been like for you and, um, how you’ve sort of navigated that space.

Maida:
Yeah, certainly. I, um, one thing I noticed at first was how, and it was more of a looking back, they didn’t realize how much gray I wore or how much like earth tones I wore it that I was really,

Maida:
it was really camouflaging myself and how I, I walked with my eyes down and they didn’t make eye contact. And you know, one of the first things I noticed was people who had opened the door for me and who would make eye contact and smile. And, and at first, I felt from his best, but like I was like, would you be paying attention to me? Would you be as kind to me if I were in my former body? And, um Hmm. So it’s interesting how these little things like wearing color have, um, been a part of this whole experience. And then, um, as far as the, uh, the skin was concerned, I certainly did have like, I had this discomfort like I was wearing, um, like my old clothes. Oh. You know, clothes that no longer fit my body. And so I did opt to, I have, I’ve had two rounds of skin removal surgery and I do recognize, you know, what a privilege it is to be able to have prioritized that.

Maida:
And even after the fact, like there are parts of my body that I know will never, um, they’re just going to be how they are because of the experience my body has had. And [inaudible]. Now when I consider changing those, I asked myself why, like I’m no longer, I’m inhibited in a way, like where my skin is getting in my way. You know, I feel like I’m in the right body. Um, I’m not sure wearing somebody else’s clothing and, or someone else’s skin and Mmm. But then, you know, I know that that can go off the end to where then we’re looking at every, you know, perceived imperfection and trying to tighten up this and do that. And I really had to sit and go, you know what, we’re good, you know, and what is it that you want to portray to your children and to the people around you. You know, like, I just, I just got rid of that, which was in my way as far as functioning. And, um, other than that, you know, I’m, I, I’m just came too to that place, a body neutrality that you talk about of just being here and it’s not, it, it doesn’t, it’s not always like, yay, I love this, but it’s, I’m, it’s my body. It does a lot of wonderful things for me. I’m just so grateful that it has forgiven me, um, for what I’ve done to it.

Steph:
Yeah, it’s an, it’s a, you know, like a relationship and there’s so much that goes into it. I think that forgiveness is a huge part of it. Um, thanks for sharing all that. And I know another thing that we talked about that I thought was really

Steph:
just, so it just really stuck out to me. Um, you know, I know that you’re really in the space of giving people access to experiencing what better health can do for them, how it can make them feel, um, and ER independent perhaps of their physical body and how much space they occupy. And yet, you said this earlier and it just struck me, you said, you know, talking about if I ever post a photo from my, when I was in a larger body and I’m in a smaller body now, like how do I navigate that space of not necessarily portraying, you know, my experience is that I’m in a smaller body, but like how do I not make it a before and after picture? And I thought, gosh, that was such an interesting thing to have you speak about.

Maida:
Yeah, it, I, I do have to look at that and I guess it gives me the opportunity to share and to have someone visualize that, um, you know, if, if their body is more like my body was, you know, years ago, um, my surgery was in 2007 so, you know, it’s been, um, over 12 years and that they may just see that difference and go, Oh yeah, that’s easy to see why you would feel better, but to know that, um, I want to make sure that when those pictures are there that they recognize that that change didn’t happen, um, in changing size and that all of this change happened with what you see. Um, the change is very minimal, but it, I also don’t want to shut the door on my past because I also think that those photographs let people know. I know what it’s like. I’ve walked through the world. I’ve had to ask for, you know, a seatbelt extension. I’ve not been able to have the tray table down on an airplane. You know, I’ve not gotten to ride the roller coaster or goes zip-lining. And you know, I know what that’s like. And

Maida:
if you knew, just being able to, um, share that so they know that I’ve, I know a little bit of their, of what their experience may be like. Of course, it’s also different in everybody’s situation, in life circumstances and all of that. But I do have a little bit of, um, insight, empathy and, um, compassion in a way that because of the things I’ve experienced that I get to share with them. Um, so

Maida:
that part is, um, keeps me [inaudible] and not wanting to hide my past, not wanting to feel like I need to, um, hide where I was because I think that there’s something in that and something in that expectation of, you know when I’m in a smaller body, this is what life’s going to be like. And it, and you can experience the freedom and the joy and the connection that I’ve experienced in the past seven years, um, without your body changing, um, on the outside. And, um, I can’t speak to that. I haven’t had that experience of staying in a larger body and then having this. But, um, but I can, um, experience the joy of people getting to walk through the world and not suffering because they’ve been able to address those fruit causes and make those connections with how things make them feel. There’s a difference whether you have a larger body or a smaller body.

Maida:
If you don’t have migraine headaches that are keeping you from enjoying time with your family, that’s an impact. You know, if you don’t have pain from rheumatoid arthritis that’s keeping you in bed or unable to be as active as you’d like, that’s an impact. Um, so there are so many things that can change your sleep, can improve your energy levels, your, um, your concerns about, you know, your blood work and all of those things mean so many things can change regardless of the, you know, size or shape of your body. And so, um, I hope that it just only serves to help connect me to more people and um, let them know that I share a little bit in common with them that perhaps they don’t see from me today.

Steph:
I really appreciate you sharing that. I have nothing to add other than powerful. It was really powerful to hear your experiences with that. Um, and I know it’s going to be really important for people. It’s making me tear up. Um, honestly cause it’s just, um, I really appreciate you sharing so freely so that other people can learn and have more empathy and be a better ally, be a better supporter for the people in their lives. Um, what, what role has sobriety played in this journey for you?

Maida:
It has been, it has been tremendously impactful because, you know, when I was, um, in a larger body and I was struggling with food and I truly did use food also to change, I felt, you know, if I was sad, if I was angry, if I was, um, overwhelmed, you know, I turned to food. And, um, so that was, that was just part of my experience of, of that emotional eating. And so when I had the surgery and was unable to, um, to lean on food and sugar the way I did before, um, alcohol suddenly became a problem and it kind of blindsided me. I was, um, I was like, wait a second. I’ve always been a normal drinker. Like if we had, you know, a bottle of vodka in the freezer, it would last a year. If we didn’t have a party, you know, we had a six-pack of beer, it would sit in there forever, half a bottle of wine.

Maida:
We would dump it out because we didn’t know if it had gone bad, you know, and then suddenly, you know, it was not just a bottle or, you know, then it was two bottles and then it was, and it was like, I don’t understand why I am, when I, once I start, I couldn’t stop. And I went to therapists and I did this work. And of course, they just say, Oh, you just have an addictive personality. And it actually took someone getting angry with me and saying, you know what, you’re going to an AA meeting and you’re going to go four times a week and this is what you’re going to do. And I was such a people pleaser and that I was like, okay, I’ll just go, you know? Okay. If you won’t be mad at me, I’ll just go, you know? And, um, I wasn’t sure if I belonged, you know, I went in those rooms and I wasn’t sure if I belonged and they just invited me to stay.

Maida:
And, um, it was not a linear process, but you know, I’m just, I’m so incredibly grateful that it took what it took to get me to that work. And, um, I can’t say enough for the 12 steps. And you know, it was recommended to me one time years ago, um, that I go to a, um, to Overeaters anonymous and I just took it as a criticism. I didn’t take it as, you know, a suggestion to help me. I took it as, you know, Oh, maybe you need to go deal with this and maybe you should go and be with those people, you know, like it because of who it was coming from. It wasn’t coming from anyone who had had that experience. And, um, and now I am so grateful to be able to have had that experience so I can share it with others. And perhaps, you know, um, I won’t say that it’s, you know, the 12 steps are for everyone, but they have impacted my life like absolutely nothing else has

Maida:
And, um, they allowed me to get honest with myself. I always considered myself, you know, an honest person, but I didn’t realize how much I, um, I lied to myself and how that impacted, um, and how much was driven by fear. And, um, doing that work allows me to be completely rigorously, humbly honest and um, and to know that there’s a reason, you know, and um, there’s a purpose and I get to be of service and um, in being open and vulnerable and sharing that with other people, it gives people, it gives them space to be open and vulnerable and share too.

Steph:
thank you.

Steph:
is there, I guess this is probably my last question because we’re almost at time, which is okay. Um, what role, if any, has developed or experienced the same, some kind of spiritual life played into this whole, this whole journey for you, where you are, who you are today? Um, the things that you are really passionate about helping people really build their health in a very holistic way.

Maida:
I, um, I think the biggest way is knowing that I don’t have to have the answers. I don’t have to know what my business is going to look like in a year. I don’t know how, I don’t have to know, um, what the product of my actions are. You know what that’s going to be like. I don’t go into something and say, okay, if I do this then I can expect this return. I just follow. And um, I’ve learned that if I’m moving the pieces around too much, I start to get uneasy because it’s like I think that I know what’s best. Instead of leaving myself open, I can do the work. I can show up every day and do something and give. Um, but when I’m tied to an outcome, then I, I limit myself because that may not be with the outcome is at all. And actually part of this ties back to you because you posted about a place here in Austin and then that place here in Austin, um, made a post and it has nothing to do with what I do, but for some reason, I felt compelled to reach out to them and now I’m, I’m following.

Maida:
And it’s like, um, whether I, I ended up in the role that, you know, was being advertised, um, or I don’t, there was something in that direction and there’s so much freedom of like not having that expectation of a particular outcome and just going like, Hey, you know, this, this feels like the next right action. Let’s see where this goes. I’m really excited to discover that rather than like, Oh my gosh, this is what I have to do to make this happen and I need to put all these pieces in place. It’s just so much more freeing and exciting.

Steph:
I love that. I am sitting here nodding, kind of very much the stuff I’ve been leaning into in the last year-ish is, you know, cause I’m the queen of like, I’ve got to figure it all out and it’s freaking overwhelming. It’s, you know, like that energy, like forgot to figure it all out. I got to know from start to finish what it’s going to be like and, and putting some more trust and surrender into that. You know, what’s the, just the one next thing to do and follow the energy and where it feels really light and really good.

Maida:
I bet. I think it’s been beautiful to watch you doing that and leaning in. Um, when you first like stopped doing two podcasts a week and it was like, ah, you know, it’s like, it was, it felt like a letting go of fear because you know, it’s like, it’s like, well what do people expect and what does that sentence like? You get to be a model for following what feels right in your gut and knowing that piece. And even when you in there, sometimes we make those decisions that aren’t what we want, but they feel right. You know, it’s like on the outside or like [inaudible] I really don’t want to have to do this, but you have that like feeling that when you’re doing it you’re like, no, this is the right thing to do. Yeah, okay, here we go. And um, so that’s been fun to watch and, and knowing that when you, you’re modeling that for other people and um, you know, they get to grow from that to not just from all the knowledge and encouragement that you shared.

Steph:
Thanks. There’s so, it’s not without a lot of hand wringing and kicking and screaming and digging in my little, uh, goatee Capricorn hose at the same time. Like, ah, I don’t want to do this. But like you said, it just feels so like, it feels like the right thing to do.

Maida:
Yeah. I call that like my inner toddler. It’s like I don’t wanna I don’t want it.

Steph:
Exactly. This is such an incredible conversation and such an incredible gift that you just shared with not just me, but with everybody who’s going to listen to this show. Um, I’m so incredibly grateful for your openness, your candor, your, uh, your vulnerability, your willingness to just be who you are and, and give that to all of us been. This has been an incredible, incredible half hour. Um, will you tell everybody where they can get ahold of you? Where can they learn more about your coaching and the things that you’re doing?

Maida:
Certainly. Um, my website is nuanced nutrition.com and I, um, one of my things that I’ve just started is I’ve just started blogging and it’s terrifying and I have just given myself permission to be a beginner. But, um, you know, I hope to just be as open and genuine and messy and as all of the things and create connections and um, and hope that some of that resonates with folks and I would love to hear back if something that I write resonates. Um, that’s a nuance. nutrition.com. Um, I met nuanced nutrition on Instagram and on Facebook as well. I do most of my content on Instagram and um, that’s it. That’s all I have in the, in the books right now.

Steph:
All right, well it’s a lot of good stuff. So yeah, everybody needs to navigate themselves over there and go get hooked up. They’ll follow you on Instagram if they’re not already doing that. It’s some good stuff. You won’t be disappointed, um, at work going to like all that stuff in the show notes too so folks can just navigate over there if they were driving when this came up or whatever. So we’ll, we’ll get everybody over to meet you and hear more about what you have to say cause it’s really important. Thank you. Yeah, you’re welcome. All right, my difference. Thank you so much for being part of the listen to your body podcast. I really appreciate it and I hope to talk to you very, very soon.

Maida:
My pleasure.

Steph:
There you go. Oh my goodness. What an episode. Truly, I did have tears in my eyes, so grateful to might for sharing her perspectives, her points of view for really opening up this dialogue and for sharing that with not just me, but with you and the entire community who listens to this podcast. You can get the show notes for this episode over on my website, Steph gaudreau.com there. You can find a transcript if you prefer to read and of course, links to everything that might is up too. If you want to connect with her in more detail, please go and do that and if you didn’t catch those links, you can find them in the show notes and before you head off, make sure you have hit subscribe on your podcast app. If you can rate the show, review the show, but when you hit subscribe, it is going to deliver every new episode to your device.

Steph:
You don’t have to go looking for it. It just automatically shows up every Tuesday when the show drops off early in the Twilight hours of Tuesday mornings and that helps new people to find the show. It is what helps grow this podcast very organically in the community with people who may never have heard of it before. And the number of times that folks tell me, Hey, I found this work from your podcast and I just stumbled upon it, or a friend shared it with me, that it really is a testament to the power of you as a listener and you sharing this with your friends, family, and loved ones, and of course, hitting the subscribe button. So thank you so very much for doing that. I’m going to be back next week with a big old treat for you. I am so pumped for this episode that’s coming up next week as well, so you’re going to have to stay to no more teasers on that. All right. Until then, be well.

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Hi, I'm Steph!

Lord of the Rings nerd, cold brew drinker, and depending on who you ask, crazy cat lady. My mission is to help you fuel for more, not less: bigger muscles, strength, energy, and possibilities. We’ll do it with my signature blend of science, strategy…and a little bit of sass.

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